A matter of patience

Serene Photographs of Isolated Landscapes and Lone Animals by Petros Koublis

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Subtly influenced by Greek mythology, photographer Petros Koublis waits for scenes to unfold rather than push preconceived concepts onto the natural environments that surround him. This patience gives him access to moments of complete serenity on the outskirts of Athens, snapshots of wheat being pushed softly by the wind and singular animals caught by chance in the center of the frame.

“It’s all a matter of openness, letting everything flow through my soul undisturbed,” Koublis told Colossal about his process. “The olive groves, the pine forests, the sea, or even the peacefully grazing animals in the meadows—they’re all part of a very intimate experience with nature. They are part of us on an emotional level that goes beyond our present state as it reaches back to a forgotten memory of our origin.”

The Greek photographer does not attempt to transform his subjects, but allows them to alter his own approach to each image. Beginning his artistic practice originally as a painter, Koublis began to explore the medium of photography in 2000, studying in Athens, Greece. Koublis’s first photobook INLANDS was published early last year by Black Mountain Books. You can keep updated on his photography on his Facebook page here. (viaFeature Shoot)

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originally posted on Collosal

The winter cluster of the bees

Reblogged from Writer’s Almanac

The Bee Carol

Silently on Christmas Eve,
the turn of midnight’s key;
all the garden locked in ice —
a silver frieze —
except the winter cluster of the bees.

Flightless now and shivering,
around their Queen they cling;
every bee a gift of heat;
she will not freeze
within the winter cluster of the bees.

Bring me for my Christmas gift
a single golden jar;
let me taste the sweetness there,
but honey leave
to feed the winter cluster of the bees.

Come with me on Christmas Eve
to see the silent hive —
trembling stars cloistered above —
and then believe,
bless the winter cluster of the bees.

“The Bee Carol” by Carol Ann Duffy from The Bees. © Faber & Faber, Inc., 2011. Reprinted with permission.  (buy now)

Wow.

 Reblogged from BuzzFeed:

Dave Sandford has always been drawn to the water. “From my early childhood, I’ve always had a fascination with oceans and lakes, and the creatures that live within them,” he told BuzzFeed Canada.

Dave Sandford has always been drawn to the water. "From my early childhood, I've always had a fascination with oceans and lakes, and the creatures that live within them," he told BuzzFeed Canada.

Dave Sandford / Via instagram.com

He recently spent time on Lake Erie shooting the Great Lake’s turbulent fall season. From mid-October to mid-November, thelongtime professional sports photographer travelled each week to Port Stanley, Ontario, on the edge of Lake Erie to spend hours taking photos.

This series of images shows what this Great Lake looks like after the sunbathers and boaters leave and the weather begins to turn.

1. His goal was to capture the exact moment when lake waves driven by gusting winds collide with a rebound wave that’s created when the water hits a pier and collection of boulders on the shore.

His goal was to capture the exact moment when lake waves driven by gusting winds collide with a rebound wave that's created when the water hits a pier and collection of boulders on the shore.

Dave Sandford

2. “The best way I can describe the water is it’s like a washing machine. It’s not like ocean waves, where you have a nice set that’s rolling in. They are really erratic, they go all over the place, and there is a strong undertow there so it can be a very dangerous place.”

"The best way I can describe the water is it’s like a washing machine. It’s not like ocean waves, where you have a nice set that’s rolling in. They are really erratic, they go all over the place, and there is a strong undertow there so it can be a very dangerous place."

Dave Sandford

3.

Dave Sandford

4. “I’ve had a number of people cotact me that used to live by the Great Lakes …. and they said the photos really stirred something inside them because they grew up there and know what the water can be like.”

"I’ve had a number of people cotact me that used to live by the Great Lakes .... and they said the photos really stirred something inside them because they grew up there and know what the water can be like."

Dave Sandford

5.

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6. “I’m hearing from other people that are blown away. They say, ‘This can’t be a lake, it’s got to be an ocean.’ They had no idea that a lake could generate waves of this size and force.”

"I'm hearing from other people that are blown away. They say, 'This can’t be a lake, it’s got to be an ocean.' They had no idea that a lake could generate waves of this size and force."

Dave Sandford

7.

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8. “The wave [in this photo] looks sort of like a mountain. I’ve already had it printed up for my own wall at home. These waves move so fast. It’s insane how fast they form, and then from the time that they form to that nice peak to exploding, it’s a mere second.”

"The wave [in this photo] looks sort of like a mountain. I've already had it printed up for my own wall at home. These waves move so fast. It’s insane how fast they form, and then from the time that they form to that nice peak to exploding, it’s a mere second."

Dave Sandford

9. “I really enjoyed that challenge, when I was out there, of getting it when it’s in that almost perfect peak on both sides before it explodes, so it has that look of a mountain or a volcano.”

"I really enjoyed that challenge, when I was out there, of getting it when it’s in that almost perfect peak on both sides before it explodes, so it has that look of a mountain or a volcano."

Dave Sandford

10. “There was only one evening where the sun broke through. Most were very overcast days.”

"There was only one evening where the sun broke through. Most were very overcast days."

Dave Sandford
11.

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12. “I enjoy the challenge of freezing things in time. Getting them at the right moment — at the peak moment.”

"I enjoy the challenge of freezing things in time. Getting them at the right moment — at the peak moment."

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13. He said his sports photography and his waves series share one important characteristic. “In all the things I’ve made my living doing in photography there are no do-overs no re-dos. You get one shot at it and that’s it, so it really helps you hone your craft.”

He said his sports photography and his waves series share one important characteristic. "In all the things I’ve made my living doing in photography there are no do-overs no re-dos. You get one shot at it and that’s it, so it really helps you hone your craft."

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14.

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15. “When you’re on a beach you don’t have a studio setting where you can set something or someone up and have multiple opportunities to get it. It’s one and done.”

"When you're on a beach you don’t have a studio setting where you can set something or someone up and have multiple opportunities to get it. It's one and done."

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16.

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17.

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18.

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19. “No two waves are ever the same — you either have it or you don’t.”

"No two waves are ever the same — you either have it or you don't."

Dave Sandford