Do well whatever you do . . .

Sr. Dorcee:

Friday from the arichives

Originally posted on Wonder and Beauty:

road-sweeper

If a man is called a streetsweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music, or Shakespeare wrote poetry.  He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and Earth will pause to say, Here lived a great streetsweeper who did his job well. ” (Martin Luther King, Jr.)

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Monsoon

Sr. Dorcee:

I always have to reblog Steve McCurry’s stuff. He’s fantastic.

“During the year I spent following the monsoon in a dozen countries, I learned to see it as a critically important event, and not the disaster it had first seemed to my Western eyes. “

Originally posted on Steve McCurry's Blog:

INDIA-10219

Rajasthan, India

For months there is no rain, and then there is too much.
Half the world’s people survive at the whim of the monsoon.


INDIA-10926Bihar, India

I was eleven years old when I saw a photo essay on the monsoon in India in Life Magazine by
Brian Brake, the New Zealand-born Magnum photographer.
His work established his reputation as a master color photo essayist.
Twenty years later, I proposed a story to National Geographic to photograph the monsoon.

INDIA-11984Worli, India

INDIA-10214Bombay/Mumbai, India


INDIA-10004NFPorbandar, India


AUSTRALIA-10009Australia

Monsoons, Australia, River, Arnumlan River, swollen by the Monsoon rains, snaking through Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia, 1984. Pg 55 Untold: The Stories Behind the Photographs Untold_bookAustralia

Monsoon History

The air is wet, soaks
into mattresses, and curls
In apparitions of smoke,
Like fat white slugs furled
Among the timber
Or silver fish tunnelling
The damp linen covers
Of schoolbooks, or walking
Quietly like centipedes,
The air walking everywhere
On its hundred feet
Is filled with the glare
Of tropical water.
Again we are taken over
By clouds and rolling darkness.

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What a cool idea for photos

From mymodernmet.com 

“Japanese photographer Takashi Kitajima captures the same Tokyo scenes in two different ways and juxtaposes them in one gorgeous composition. His series is titled Glassporthole, and it features a diffused and blurry view of the city where the buildings, streets, and signage are fused into a dazzling mixture of color, light, and shape. In addition to the abstract images, Kitajima also looks at the landscape through a magnifying glass. This tool brings everything into a tight focus and presents a miniaturized version of what’s before us.”  Read and see the rest of the photos here.

TakashiKitajima5 TakashiKitajima7